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Introducing Anchor Ceramics

Introducing Anchor Ceramics

Robert Plumb is proud to add the refined work of Melbourne studio, Anchor Ceramics to their showroom and online store. Anchor Ceramics produce a beautiful range of wheel thrown pots and planters. These pieces offer the unique qualities of hand made ceramics with throwing lines, glaze variations and subtle textural differences. Founded by former architect Bruce Rowe in 2013, the studio has gone from strength to strength creating architecturally inspired planters for discerning homes and inspiring outdoor areas. These geometric forms are perfectly balanced by the organic beauty of their earthy glazes.

The planters currently come in two ranges – Undercut and Funnel. Undercut planters have a small step carved at the base to provide visual interest while the Funnel planters take inspiration from traditional water pipes with a flared mouth that is larger than the base. Undercut planters come in three diameters -small medium and large - with each one available in two heights - low and tall - providing six shapes in total. The planters are made with a drainage whole and matching drip trays are available for the Undercut range.

 The Funnel planters, like the Undercut are not made to exact sizes, rather each vessel is wheel thrown from a precise amount of clay and the size judged by the potter’s eye. The small variations in size that result emphasize the planter’s handmade qualities and add to their overall uniqueness.

Bruce Lowe: Founder of Anchor Ceramics

The Anchor Ceramics planters are just one facet of the creative output of Bruce Rowe and his team of dedicated makers. The studio also produces a number of interior ceramic light fittings and ceramic wall hooks along with a range of ceramic surfaced side tables for Grazia & Co.

In recent years Rowe has also created limited edition and one off ceramic sculpture pieces exhibiting them through Hub Furniture in Melbourne. These art pieces explore architectural references such as open stairs, the classical arch, porticos and windows. In this area of Rowe’s work, each piece is hand cut from slab rolled clay, bisque fired, generally glazed, then fired for a second time to 1280 degrees. The resulting forms are made all the more beautiful by the interesting way that the glazes break on defined edges.